Post Secondary Options

Young woman reading a book lying on the grassUnderstanding your options after high school and creating a plan is important to future success. Options such as a four-year college, two-year college, vocational-technical school or program, adult education and continuing education or a life skill program are all options to be considered after graduation from high school.
 
 
 
 

High School Equivalency Exams

What are high school equivalency exams? High school equivalency exams are tests available for people age 16 and older who did not finish high school. Many people who did not finish high school have the same knowledge and skills as those who did graduate. Others can enroll in an adult education program to gain the knowledge and skills they need to pass a high school equivalency exam. By taking and passing one of these exams, adults can demonstrate they have acquired the same level of knowledge as someone who has completed high school. The person then earns a certificate that… Read More »

Rights and Responsibilities of College Students with Learning Disabilities (LD)

Download/Print Rights and Responsibilities of College Students with Learning Disabilities Info Sheet Legal Rights of College Students with LD Academic accommodations are required by law for eligible college students with LD. Accommodations are changes in the learning and testing environments that give college students with LD an equal opportunity to learn. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments (ADAAA) require that reasonable accommodations be made available to college students who have current documentation of learning disabilities and who request learning and/or testing accommodations. Student Responsibilities Student responsibilities include the following: To self-identify as a person with a disability… Read More »

Transitioning from College to Work

Download/Print Transitioning From College To Work Info Sheet Transitioning from college to work is a process. Students must begin this process early and be able to transfer knowledge of their learning disability (LD) into the world of employment. Students should consider the following: What do I think the impact of the LD will be on my job performance? How or when should I disclose my LD? Do I know the typical accommodations made in the workforce? What kinds of social demands and interactions will I have? Students must recognize the disability’s impact on career choices. Knowledge of the disability and… Read More »

Financial Aid for College Students with Learning Disabilities (LD)

Download/Print  Financial Aid for College Students with LD Info Sheet Why Financial Aid is Important for College Students with LD Many students with LD need smaller colleges or private colleges for the individual support they offer. Many students with LD require the support of fee-based programs. Some students with LD may not be able to effectively demonstrate their intelligence through GPAs and test scores so they may not qualify for academic scholarships How to Prepare to Qualify for Scholarships Begin in 9th grade! Carefully choose classes to complete requirements for scholarships. Insure that accommodations are being made in class, but not… Read More »

Resources for Job Seekers

What resources are available? Due to the national focus of LDA, the resources listed are nationally-based resources. This is not a complete list of resources, but should be a good place to start. Topics covered are internet-accessible job search, Federal employment, workplace accommodations, and other resources to assist people with disabilities who are seeking employment. Included are links to the Office of Disability Employment Policy, Job Hunt, US Office of Personnel Management, Job Accommodation Network (JAN), Pathways to Employment, Getting Hired, Rehabilitation Services Administration, ABILITY Jobs and Jobs Access, US Business Leadership Network, Pathways to Employment, and American Association for… Read More »

Job Accommodation Ideas for People with Learning Disabilities

The term “reasonable accommodations” refers to changes in the workplace that enable people with disabilities to effectively perform the tasks associated with their job. Accommodations can help people with learning disabilities do their job well, even when their disability gets in the way. Accommodations can vary and it is important to choose the right ones to fit your needs.  There are many solutions to help accommodate problems that may get in your way of success. Accommodations can include variations in: the work space and equipment needed to do the task, the communication of the work, the tasks themselves and the… Read More »

Learning Disabilities and The Law: After High School: An Overview for Students

Do the legal rights of students with learning disabilities continue after high school? Legal rights may continue. It depends upon the facts in the individual case. Children with learning disabilities who receive services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (RA) in public elementary and secondary school may continue to have legal rights under federal laws in college programs and in employment. When students graduate from high school or reach age 21, their rights under the IDEA come to an end. The rights that may continue are those under the Rehabilitation Act and… Read More »

Transition Planning Requirements of IDEA 2004

What is transition planning? Transition planning is a process mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004) for all students who have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) in K-12 education. The purpose is to facilitate the student’s move from school to post-school activities. The transition planning must: start before the student turns 16; be individualized; be based on the student’s strengths, preferences, and interests; and include opportunities to develop functional skills for work and community life. Who develops the transition plan? The IEP team; The student; Parents; Optional–employers, college representatives, student advocates What is the transition team’s job?… Read More »

Post Secondary Educational Options

There are many postsecondary options for people who have learning disabilities. Whether it’s a four-year college, a two-year college, a technical program, adult basic education, continuing education, or a life skills program, the key to choosing the right school for you starts with these steps: Contact your selected school’s Office of Disability Support Services to set up a meeting. Take your current learning disability documentation with you for that meeting. Know what accommodations you will need to ask for in a college or university setting. Determine if the school will provide your requested accommodations. Follow with a tour of the… Read More »