58th Annual international conference / february 18-21, 2021 / new orleans, la

Save the Date!

LDA has issued formal positions on the following topics:

Inconsistency in Evaluation and Identification:  LDA’s Follow-up to the GAO’s Report on Child Find

Since IDEA assigns Child Find responsibilities to the state level, there is no uniformity in how students are identified besides minimum criteria outlined by IDEA. As of 2016, the percentage of children aged 6 through 21, state by state, that were provided special education ranged from 6.4 percent to 15.1 percent throughout (GAO, 2019). Concerns about identification and evaluation are frequently noted by advocates and at times. As an organization advocating for the rights of all individuals with learning disabilities, the Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA) often assists parents who are finding their requests for evaluation of their child going unanswered. LDA is aware that both over and under-identification of minority students for special education is problematic across the nation. Read the full report here.

STORIES FROM THE TESTING ROOM – High School Equivalency Exams:  Accessibility of Accommodations for Persons with Learning Disabilities

The HSEE Report first provides a brief outline of the current law on testing accommodations and  “high stakes” tests. Then it provides information on a recent report prepared for the U.S. Department of Labor on high school equivalency exams. And, lastly the HSEE Report presents a description of the process of applying for accommodations as seen from the point-of-view of test applicants with a learning disability, and the adult education professionals and evaluators who work with them. Read the full report here.

Third Grade Reading Laws

Over the last dozen years, more than 30 states have passed third grade reading laws. These laws set standards on how well students must be performing in reading to move on to fourth grade. In most states, these laws apply to all students, including students with learning and attention issues who are struggling with reading. Recognizing this, LDA and NCLD came together to create an infographic and a set of best practices to help parents and policymakers make informed decisions about third grade reading laws and better understand the issue of grade retention.

Take a look at the Infographic on Third Grade Reading or our Best Practices for Third Grade Reading Policies

Transition for Adults with Learning Disabilities in Adult Education

Transition planning and services for adults with learning disabilities (LD) enrolled in adult basic education (ABE), literacy and GED programs must be of paramount importance.  There must be adequate planning, services and support to assist students with LD to transition from ABE programs to postsecondary and work environments.

Read the LDA Position Paper on Transition for Adults with Learning Disabilities in Adult Education

LDA White Paper on IDEA Evaluation Criteria for SLD

The background and reason for the White Paper became apparent when the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Statute was published in 2004. Members of the LDA Board of Directors were pleased that the definition of Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) remained intact. But when the Regulations were published in 2006, it was surprising to find that the SLD evaluation criteria and identification criteria were no longer aligned with the SLD definition in IDEA.

Read LDA White Paper on IDEA Evaluation Criteria for SLD

Right to an Evaluation of a Child for Special Education Services

Right to an Evaluation of a Child for Special Education Services Parents who are aware their child is having a difficult time with reading, mathematics, written expression or other aspects of school work might suspect that the child has a learning disability (LD), also known as specific learning disabilities, and may be in need of special education services. As a parent, guardian or advocate, you have a legal right to request that your public school evaluate your child for special education.

Read LDA’s position paper on Right to an Evaluation of a Child for Special Education Services (February 2013)

Full Inclusion of All Students with Learning Disabilities in the Regular Education Classroom

“Full inclusion,” “full integration,” “unified system,” and “inclusive education” are terms used to describe a popular policy/practice in which all students with disabilities, regardless of the nature or the severity of the disability and need for related services, receive their total education within the regular education classroom in their home school. The Learning Disabilities Association of America does not support full inclusion or any policies that mandate the same placement, instruction, or treatment for ALL students with learning disabilities.

Read LDA’s position paper on Full Inclusion (Updated June 2012)

Response to Intervention (RTI)

Response to Intervention (RTI) has far reaching implications for children with SLD. It is imperative that LDA responds to this initiative, supporting those components of RTI which can benefit individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities and identifying other components that are not in their best interest.

Read LDA’s position paper on Response to Intervention

Violence in Schools

LDA strongly supports efforts to eliminate violence in American schools. LDA agrees that students, including students with learning disabilities, whose violent behavior is a danger to themselves or others must be immediately removed from the current school setting. LDA also supports current law which ensures that students with learning disabilities so removed remain entitled to a free appropriate public education, as provided through the Individualized Education Program process.

Read LDA’s position paper on Violence in Schools